Selling limited edition prints

My ‘Daugter Of Woman’ series is the first time I have created work to sell as a limited edition series.

Wife Of Woman – 20x20cm Limited Edition Giclee print – Artist Proof

So I had to do some research on how to work with limited editions and what mine would look like.

Things to consider when selling work in limited editions:

Size

  • Will you sell one size or different sizes?
  • What sizes will you sell?
  • Will they be printed with a border?

I have created 3 sizes in my Daughter Of Woman series: 20cm; 40cm and 80cm. I’ve written down now, I have too stick with it! It has been so hard to choose sizes. I wanted to offer 3-4 sizes, with one, small affordable print.

Having border is also a consideration. I started out with a 2cm border in my artist proofs. But I think I’m going to change that to 5cm. This is due to framing. After doing some research, I think it will be easier to frame with a thicker border, plus I think it really draws your eye into the image. It’s such a personal decision!

Paper

What paper will you print on?

Generally speaking an archival grade paper is advisable. This means the ink won’t fade over time. A thick paper, above 180gsm gives the print stability, durability and a looks lovely too.

Edition size

How many will be printed in each size?

Each of the sizes in my ‘Daughter of Woman’ series has a different edition number. The 20x20cm images have an edition of 50, this is my affordable size. The 40x40cm have an edition size of 15 and the 80x80cm have an edition size of 5. Generally speaking, the smaller the edition number, the higher the price of the prints.

Edition numbers often reduce as the size of an image increases.

Editions sizes are totally up to the artist, there is an element of personal preference and trial and error to see what works! I’ll let you know how it goes!

Pricing

This is another tough one to think about and get right! Price too high and you risk your work not selling. Plus it doesn’t look good when an artist lowers their prices! Price too low, and you miss out on income, Ahh!

Start lower, if they sell like hot cakes, you know you can up the price of your next edition.

Think about:

  • How much the image cost to make – props, location, models. Will you pay yourself an hourly rate? How many hours did you work on the image?
  • How much it cost to print. Include the border in the print cost calculations, as you pay for the total amount of paper used – that caught me out!
  • How long you have been making fine art for and how well established you are? I am just starting out in the Fine Art world, so I won’t be attaching a premium to the cost of my limited edition prints.
  • Rarity – the smaller the edition, the more value it becomes because of how few there are in the world. An edition of 2, will be more valuable than an edition of 200.

I have been backwards and forwards for weeks and weeks on this. I just to take the plunge and commit to a decision, and see how it goes.

You don’t need to stick to the same edition and pricing structure for every image / series. So if this doesn’t work out, I can change things for my next series of work.

If you have any tips of selling limited edition prints, I would love to hear them!

Take care,

Michelle

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