Photo review from Rise International Photography Awards – Creative

The RISE International Photography Awards is a unique, online photography awards system aimed at seeing entrants elevate their work from one award year to the next.

The judges gave written feedback to all entrants on all photos entered. I entered three images into three categories: Maternity, Family and Creative.

Better than expected

My entry for the creative category was the first image from my ‘Daughter of Woman’ series, entitled –Daughter of Woman.

I hadn’t created any other images in the series at the time of entering the competition.
I had no idea how the judges would respond to this type of image, but the early bird entry fees weren’t expensive and I was curious as to what they would say about it.

The feedback

This is quirky and very cool; I love the repetition between the flower-head and the pattern on the shirt, and it’s even echoed in the background. To improve it, be careful on the masking for the glass dome-thing; there are some portions where the masking could be cleaner. It’s easiest to see the masking issues along the top left edge of the glass where it is in front of a shadowed bit of wall. The focus control on the shirt, the glass, and the background is really good, well done.

The image has great impact that grabs your attention.
A well developed and executed creative concept.

Overall a very interesting concept. Lovely use of patterns to create an intriguing composition.

I’m so cross with myself for not spotting the masking issue! It just goes to show how useful a second pair of eyes and professional review can be!

I’m going to post the feedback from my family entry soon.

Take care,

Michelle

Husband Of Woman

The third image in ‘Daughter Of Woman’ series is finished!

Husband Of Woman

I love the patterns and colours in this image and the contrast between the two.

The lightbulb is original, only cut out and not warped or anything. I hunted down all these unusually shaped lightbulbs in the series.

The wallpaper is a book of scrapbook papers based on designs from the Natural History Museum in London. They resemble more closely the vintage wallpaper I had in mind when I was conceptualising this series.

Many thanks to my almost husband for modelling the shirt!

I’ll post some information on how to get your hands on limited edition prints soon!

Take care,

Michelle

Selling limited edition prints

My ‘Daugter Of Woman’ series is the first time I have created work to sell as a limited edition series.

Wife Of Woman – 20x20cm Limited Edition Giclee print – Artist Proof

So I had to do some research on how to work with limited editions and what mine would look like.

Things to consider when selling work in limited editions:

Size

  • Will you sell one size or different sizes?
  • What sizes will you sell?
  • Will they be printed with a border?

I have created 3 sizes in my Daughter Of Woman series: 20cm; 40cm and 80cm. I’ve written down now, I have too stick with it! It has been so hard to choose sizes. I wanted to offer 3-4 sizes, with one, small affordable print.

Having border is also a consideration. I started out with a 2cm border in my artist proofs. But I think I’m going to change that to 5cm. This is due to framing. After doing some research, I think it will be easier to frame with a thicker border, plus I think it really draws your eye into the image. It’s such a personal decision!

Paper

What paper will you print on?

Generally speaking an archival grade paper is advisable. This means the ink won’t fade over time. A thick paper, above 180gsm gives the print stability, durability and a looks lovely too.

Edition size

How many will be printed in each size?

Each of the sizes in my ‘Daughter of Woman’ series has a different edition number. The 20x20cm images have an edition of 50, this is my affordable size. The 40x40cm have an edition size of 15 and the 80x80cm have an edition size of 5. Generally speaking, the smaller the edition number, the higher the price of the prints.

Edition numbers often reduce as the size of an image increases.

Editions sizes are totally up to the artist, there is an element of personal preference and trial and error to see what works! I’ll let you know how it goes!

Pricing

This is another tough one to think about and get right! Price too high and you risk your work not selling. Plus it doesn’t look good when an artist lowers their prices! Price too low, and you miss out on income, Ahh!

Start lower, if they sell like hot cakes, you know you can up the price of your next edition.

Think about:

  • How much the image cost to make – props, location, models. Will you pay yourself an hourly rate? How many hours did you work on the image?
  • How much it cost to print. Include the border in the print cost calculations, as you pay for the total amount of paper used – that caught me out!
  • How long you have been making fine art for and how well established you are? I am just starting out in the Fine Art world, so I won’t be attaching a premium to the cost of my limited edition prints.
  • Rarity – the smaller the edition, the more value it becomes because of how few there are in the world. An edition of 2, will be more valuable than an edition of 200.

I have been backwards and forwards for weeks and weeks on this. I just to take the plunge and commit to a decision, and see how it goes.

You don’t need to stick to the same edition and pricing structure for every image / series. So if this doesn’t work out, I can change things for my next series of work.

If you have any tips of selling limited edition prints, I would love to hear them!

Take care,

Michelle

Wife of Woman

Here it is, the second piece in my series ‘Daughter of Woman’!

Titled ‘Wife of Woman’, my aim is to create a ‘family’ in this series. The title concept links the pieces through them all being ‘of woman’, aka ‘born’ from a woman.

However, the main concept linking all the pieces is ‘the duality of the ego.’ The parts of us we show the world and the parts we keep hidden. I believe the parts we hide can often be our most beautiful parts (hence the flowers), which we feel too vulnerable to show.

We could debate why we hide our vulnerabilities in our society, but I might save that for a different post!

Head over to my Instagram stories to see the editing process.

Take care, Michelle 🙂

Daughter of Woman

This is the first piece in my new series.

‘Daughter of Woman’, Michelle Tasker


Inspiration

The lightbulb is from my house. I love it’s interesting shape and colour.

A pink gerbera I received in a bunch of flowers.

Credit: Unsplash

The work of Rene Magritte, particularly ‘Son of Man’. I enjoy working in Surrealism, it is liberating.

‘Son of Man’, Rene Magritte.
Credit: masterworksfineart.com

Concept

The concept behind this image alludes to the duality of the ego. The parts of us we show the world and the parts we keep hidden.

The lightbulb

The lightbulb symbolises intelligence and knowledge in western culture. A knowledge based, patriarchal culture, where femininity is weakness. Through this cultural direction, the ego portrays an acceptable character. The lightbulb gives an inhuman quality to our ego. Faceless, transparent yet hiding something.


The flower

The flower symbolises beauty and fragility: the Divine Feminine. It hides through fear of judgement, of not being good enough.

The wall paper and clothing


The clashing patterns of the wallpaper and and shirt are distracting. It shows the war between the masculine and feminine. A war that creates chaos.


The irony of the human condition is it requires both the masculine and the feminine to work in harmony. Human beings and are both Yin and Yang, regardless of gender. The suppression of either, results in chaos.